Volume 27, Issue 7 (10-2020)                   RJMS 2020, 27(7): 140-153 | Back to browse issues page

Research code: 916144005
Ethics code: IR.KMUS.REC.1398.985
Clinical trials code: NOT

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riazi Z, Monazzami A, tadibi V, kazemi S. The Acute Effects of Static and Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation (PNF) Stretching on Peak Torque and Agility on Men. RJMS. 2020; 27 (7) :140-153
URL: http://rjms.iums.ac.ir/article-1-6236-en.html
Department of Sport Physiology, Faculty of Sport Science, Razi University, Kermanshah, Iran , MONAZZAMI.AMIRABBAS@GMAIL.COM
Abstract:   (326 Views)
Background: The correct execution of sports movements depends on the method of warming up and the type of stretching. That is why it is very important to warm up properly to prevent any damage to the body and improve performance, appropriate to the type of exercise. In addition, the main reason for warming is the increase in core body temperature, which in turn leads to more blood flow to the active muscles and increases the rate of transmission of nerve impulses and chemical reactions. Although there are different debates about which stretch should be used with what intensity and volume before exercise, but usually static stretch before training and sports competition in warming up section is used. PNF stretching  is thought to be superior to other stretch methods in developing range of motion due to the activation of the golgy tendon organ by the Autogenic Inhibition method and the facilitation of muscle inhibitory receptors, but the effects of PNF stretch on the performance is very controversial. Therefore, The current study aimed to determine the effects of static and PNF stretching on maximum torque and agility of male futsal players.
Methods: Having at least 2 years of training experiences, twelve trained male Futsal players with a mean age (22.33±0.88 years), height (175.75±6.21 cm), weight (68.75±3.64 kg), BMI (22.57±1.23 kg/m2) and body fat (15.65±3.58 %) were randomly selected. They were divided into four training protocols, including static stretches (3×5 s and 3×15 s), PNF stretch (30s×6s×15 s) and control condition. The SECA1 height measurement device with a measurement accuracy of one millimeter (made in Germany) was used to measure height. The Buerer digital weight measurement device with an accuracy of 0.1 kg (made in Germany) was also used to measure the body weight of the subjects. In addition, the yo-yo recovery test was used to determine the subjectschr('39') aerobic capacity (VO2max), and the Zeus 9.9 body analyzer was used to measure body composition and fat percentage. Isokenitic dynamometer Gymnex model ISO-1 with the speed of 60 degrees per second and Balsom agility test were applied to measure maximum force torque and agility respectively. Furthermore, two-way ANOVA with repeated measures was used to compare the mean difference. Bonferroni  post hoc test was applied when the differences were significant and interval confidence of p < 0.05 considered at all stages of the test.
Results: The results of data analysis with repeated measures test in comparison between the type of stretches with the control condition in the variable of maximum torque at a speed of 60 degrees per second showed that the effect of the type of stretch(group) was significant (p=0.024, F=2.061). These results show that only the PNF stretch protocol was different from the control condition (p<0.05) and the static stretch protocols 3 × 5 s (p= 0.17) and 3 × 15 s (p=0.34) were not significantly different from the control condition. In addition, the results of the present study showed that the interaction between the type of stretch(group) and time was significant (p=0.009; F=4.59). On the other hand, The results of data analysis with repeated measures test in comparison between the type of stretches with the control condition in the variable of agility showed that the effect of the type of stretch (group) was significant (p=0.039, F=5.23).The results showed that only the PNF stretch protocol was different from the control condition (p<0.05) and the static stretch protocols 3 × 5 s (p=0.35) and 3 × 15 s (p=0.57) were not significantly different from the control ondition. In addition, the results of the present study showed that the interaction between the type of stretch(group) and time was significant (p=0.044; F=4.45).
Conclusion: Overall, the results show that the implementation of static stretching protocols and PNF above 90 seconds has a destructive effect on the performance of torque and agility of futsal players. Among the most important mechanisms affecting performance can be the destruction of muscle tendon features, involved neural mechanisms (decrease in firing frequency, increase in nervous fatigue and decrease in concentration), mechanical properties and muscle elasticity, duration, intensity and type of stretch, gender and level of fitness of the athlete employed were mentioned. Therefore, to reduce the destructive effects of this type of stretching and on the other hand increase the efficiency of muscles to improve performance in the warm-up phase, it is recommended to futsal players, If using static  and PNF stretches, do not use times longer than 90 seconds..
 
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Type of Study: Research | Subject: Exercise Physiology

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