Volume 25, Issue 8 (Oct-Nov 2018)                   RJMS 2018, 25(8): 83-90 | Back to browse issues page

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Alzahra University, Tehran, Iran , f.kazemi@alzahra.ac.i
Abstract:   (2624 Views)
Background: Peptide apelin regulates appetite and food intake and responses to exercise. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of 7-week aerobic training on food intake and appetite-regulating hormone "apelin" in male diabetic rats.
Methods: Twenty-one diabetic male Wistar rats were allocated into non-diabetic, control diabetic and trained diabetic group (7-week running at moderate intensity) (7 rats each), 4 weeks after induction of type 2 diabetes. During the period of training, body weight and food intake were measured and after the period of training, serum apelin and glucose measured. One-way analysis of variance and one-way repeated measures analysis of variance were used for analyzing data.
Results: The body weight of trained diabetic compared with nondiabetic and control diabetic group decreased significantly (p<0.05). There was no significant difference between food intakes in 3 groups (p>0.05). Serum glucose increased significantly in control diabetic and trained diabetic group compared with nondiabetic group, wheras serum glucose decreased significantly in trained diabetic group compared with control diabetic group (p<0.05). Moreover, serum apelin increased significantly in control diabetic and trained diabetic group compared with nondiabetic group as well as in trained diabetic group compared with control diabetic (p<0.05).
Conclusion: Aerobic training without changing food intake decreased the body weight of male diabetic rats. Also, aerobic training independently of food intake by decrease of serum glucose increased appetite-regulating hormone "apelin" in male diabetic rats.
 
 
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Type of Study: Research | Subject: Exercise Physiology

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